Reading Pile: 7/13/13

Reading Pile: 7/13/13

Sheltered, Superior Spider-Man, & Thumbprint

Sheltered #1- Another good example that proves for me that Image is currently the most innovative mainstream publisher in the industry. It feels like every month they are offering ten new series and of those at least 5-6 are worth checking out if not fantastic. That’s a pretty good turnover rate, and I believe it’s building a general sense of good will among readers to try new things by creators they haven’t been exposed to before. Ed Brisson and Johnnie Christmas set up a very intriguing first issue here that focuses on a small community of survivalists/preparationists who are getting ready for the eventual apocalypse/government invasion. It takes an interesting turn when the children of the community all turn on their parents and kill most of the adults, hinting that they know something horrible is coming and that this is the best chance of survival. Cleverly labeled as a ‘Pre-Apocalyptic Tale’, it does a great job of setting up a general atmosphere and tone while leaving plenty of mystery to really draw you back into the next issue. Christmas’ art reminds me of a balanced hybrid between Nick Dragotta and Riley Rossmo, with maybe a hint of Jeff Lamire and Steve Lieber thrown in for good measure. The story and art really complement each other, and it’s a well-paced read clocking in at twenty-two pages (no ads) for $2.99. Definitely worth checking out. A

 

Superior Spider-Man #13- This title is sort of turning into my guilty pleasure. As much as I know it’s a gimmick, I kind of love Doc Ock being the Spider-Man who fights evil in a conquery way. The fact that he now has a government sanctioned island base (dubbed Spider-Island II) that he will apparently populate with minions to aid him in his diabolical do-gooding sort of wins. B+

Joe Hill’s Thumbprint #1- I always feel like I’m coming at a comic like this at an odd angle when I have never read the original book it’s adapted from. It’s also a little off putting to me when they sell a title with the original creator’s name but he didn’t actually script the comic. I actually don’t have anything against Jason Ciaramelia, he’s a solid scripter. I just figure if Joe Hill can write Locke and Key then it’s not too far off for me to be disappointed that it’s just his name slapped onto this book. Regardless of all that, Ciaramella and Malhotra set up an interesting first issue here and Malhotra’s art works perfectly for the story.  If you’re in the mood for a dark mystery that feels like it’s going to get a bit disturbing, this might be a good fit for you. B