Reading Pile: 12/18/15

Reading Pile: 12/18/15

Citizen Jack, Howard the Duck, & Hercules

Citizen Jack #1- Sam Humphries and Tommy Patterson present a pretty engaging story about a horrible idiot running for President with the backing of some sort of demonic entity. So you know, it’s basically a non-fiction piece of political journalism that’s not boring. The creators do a great job of building up and executing their concept, Humphries inserting an amusing amount of character into the script while Patterson’s art brings in stylistic nuances similar to the work of Chris Burnham that gives everything a weird mix of cartoonish and realistic at the same time. It’s a strong first issue and worth checking out, especially if you want a break from current real life politics and want to enjoy the refreshing honesty of a literal demon inserting itself into the political scene. A-

Howard the Duck #1- I really enjoyed this issue, but I was really enjoying it before the relaunch anyway. I mean, I’m pretty much enjoying the same thing because not a single thing has changed. I don’t think I really care much about Gwenpool because it just feels like Marvel’s usual oversaturation of popular concepts (“People like Spider-Gwen? People like Deadpool? EXCELSIOR!”). But the full issue was a lot of fun, and really that’s where Marvel has been winning out over DC for the past few years and them embracing and releasing more titles like this that makes me slightly less frustrated over their pricing, abuse of variants and other gimmicks, and the super horrible ink they’re using that bleeds and damages books and even comes off on your fingers. Hey, I may not be able to complain about the content in this book but I sure as hell will find something to complain about. A

Hercules #1- There was some negative chat before the release of this book more due to Marvel EIC Alex Alonso’s tweets, but I have a base level of trust invested in writer Dan Abnett’s writing so I kind of separate Alonso’s issues and this books actual execution. This is pretty much just another stab at making this character relevant again and Abnett decided to infuse it with a bit of epic monster slaying and a pinch of humor (so nowhere near as much as the Pak/Van Lente run of Incredible Herc). The humor is more subtle, and I appreciate it for that as he deals with a lazy Gilgamesh who’s crashing at his apartment and trying to come to terms with a modern world. Luke Ross’ artwork is a good fit and delivers well on action and comedic timing. It’s a solid first issue, and while it’s not anything groundbreaking I don’t think it needs to be as it just want to have fun and develop some character. A-