Reading Pile: 1/21/11

Reading Pile: 1/21/11

Locke & Key: Keys to the Kingdom #4- And with this issue we get the Philosophoscope and my love for Joe Hill will probably never die. Seriously, go do yourself a huge favor and start reading Locke & Key. You have no excuse that I’m willing to accept. A


Two-Step TPB- First of all, I’m going to have to separate my review of the book itself from the package because one is awesome and one is just stupid as hell. If you like Warren Ellis when he’s sticking to strange humor and sci-fi shenanigans then you’ll love this short story. If you love Amanda Conner (and you should), this is another fine piece of her body of work you should add to your collection. Now for the bad news; they are charging you $19.99 for three issues worth of comics. This is not ok, you guys. I mean it, this collection should cost you no more than $9.99. Instead they dump the script pages in here and figure hey, it’s Ellis and the mindless public will consume it just cause. We don’t need the damn script pages, we just wanted an affordable fun quick silly read (and make no mistake, it is a quick read). So for the story I give it a B+, for the package an F-

 
Marvels: Eye of the Camera TPB- I think I should make it clear right off the bat that I don’t think this was a bad story, but I’m note entirely sure it was a necessary story. It draws on longer than it really needs to and follows a familiar pattern of showing a comic event through the eye of the public and then spending time with Phil Sheldon as he comes to terms with something, gets angry, sees another comic event unfold, dwells on what it means, and so on and on. It could have been trimmed down and it certainly took long enough to come out as single issues. I doubt many readers really cared about whether or not it was going to finish, and with Jay Anacleto on art it was a good question whether or not we would actually see it come to an end. As far as the art goes, Anacleto was as close to Alex Ross as we were probably going to get and while it’s fine art it certainly feels like it’s past it’s prime in the industry. It feels like it belongs back in the late ‘90's along with Aria and the other remnants of Avalon Studios. When you read it in one solid sitting it’s a much more enjoyable story than my complaints let on and I think overall this package is worth the $19.99 price tag. It just feels a little hollow in comparison to the original and it sort of brings into focus my feelings that Kurt Busiek’s work over the past few years have been missing the spark that made his works from the ‘90's so memorable. B